Curiosity got the better of me and I had to find out what the #blimage was going on in my Twitter feed. Turns out there’s some viral edu-blogging going on. Give someone a picture and challenge them to turn it into a learning related post. This youtube video from the originator @AmyBurvall explains it nicely.

I found my pic on the #blimage pinterest board. I feel like that’s cheating because I got to choose from a great selection. This one reminded me of my Babitech avatar, and also of a podcast I listened to recently about the maker movement.

Making is not just about robots and Minecraft, it’s about understanding your environment, making meaning from the physical objects and space around you. Going back to first principles and learning by doing. A makerspace does not need thousands of pounds worth of equipment, (as nice as that would be) rather like this challenge it’s about creativity in constraint.

All you need is time, some basic materials and curiosity.

That apple in my #blimage, it’s a battery, a stamp, a pie filling, a jam, a sauce, a hallowe’en game, an embryonic orchard, cider, part of a makeymakey piano, a tree decoration, a shrunken head, a source of pectin and 20 other chemicals, a floating tea-light holder…

The ethernet cable however is useless, I’ve got wifi!

Readers of this and the Pontydysgu blog, I challenge you to continue the game of #blimage with a picture from https://www.pinterest.com/sensor63/blimage/ or with this;


Wales National Digital Learning Event 2015

Jen and I went along to the National Digital Learning Event and Awards in Cardiff earlier in June. We handed out Taccle books and went to some workshops. There were a few to choose from but I attended a technocamps session which explored some ways of teaching computer science using lego bricks, (build a simple lego structure, now explain to your partner how to build an identical structure without them seeing what you have built) using people, (direct your person around the room using simple commands) and using Cargo Bot. I like what technocamps do, kit like Lego Mindstorms is pretty expensive, so they take the kit around to secondary schools and colleges across Wales for one day workshops. For lots of ideas about how to teach computing, coding and programming for the rest of the year you could check out the Taccle2 blog and the Babitech page.

In the afternoon I had fun playing with Sonic Pi , which uses code for composing and performing music, you can see me in the video below (just after the 2 minute mark) getting flustered because there was a mistake in my loop. Don’t let that put you off, it was really good fun and a great way to get instant and useful results form your code.

The best thing about the day was seeing the great things being done across Wales with Ponty locals Big Click scooping the Commercial Digital Project Award

You can see all of the other inspirational kids and teachers getting their tech on at the Hwb website with projects like e-safety, coding with minecraft, creating an interactive local map and staging a robot wars competition.

Keep an eye out for next years entries, Welsh kids are good with technology, the competition should be tough!

On the BabiTech iPhone


Pre-school and Welsh language app reviews from my Babitech blog.

Originally posted on Babi Tech:

I’m sure you’re all dying to know which apps made it to the current BabiTech list. If there’s something missing that Babis 1 and 2 really need to have, stick it in the comments and we’ll try it out.

IMG_4720Toca Boca

Toca Boca’s Hair Xmas, Toca Builders, Toca Band, Toca Fairy Tales, Toca Hair Salon 2, Toca Kitchen Monster, Toca Doctor

Yes we are huge fans of Toca Boca, no they didn’t pay me to say that. We’ve not found one we don’t all like. The games are well thought out, catchy but not mindless, creative, educational and fun.

Apps Cymraeg

S4C Cyw, Cyw a’r Wyddor, Mwnci Bach, Tref a Tryst, Cyfri gyda Cyw, Ben Dant

The apps produced by S4C are pretty good, my favourites are Cyw a’r Wyddor which helps teach letter formation (Welsh alphabet) and Cyfri gyda Cyw which does the same with numbers. Mwnci Bach…

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London Tech Week 2015

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I had a pretty exciting and busy couple of days in London during their annual technology week.

Straight off the train I met Vini from Quizalize which is hands down the best online quiz creator for educators I have used yet with the added bonus feature of live feedback. I don’t think they are embeddable but the option of creating your own quiz app is in the pipeline.

Next I took an hour out to explore the What is Luxury? exhibition at the V&A. I enjoyed the juxtaposition of art with science and technology; a diamond made from the compressed ashes of the script of Superman 3 and a vending machine dispensing DNA samples.

The following morning I headed to Olympia for the Learning Technologies Summer Forum. Amongst the myriad of sales pitches and off the peg e-learning solutions (as if learning were something to be solved) for managing learning were a few gems. e-learning studios presented their virtual reality training courses where fully immersed in a virtual environment you can deal with an office fire, experience a day in the life of a face cream or familiarise yourself with the basics of a passenger jet cockpit.  At $350 for an OcculusRift it’s not exactly accessible technology but then there is always Google Cardboard and there are plenty of games and learning experiences for free.

Then I sat down for a cup of coffee and accidentally listened to Telefónica talking about their use of linda.com for workplace learning. I was pleasantly surprised. Basically they let their staff choose whatever it is they want to learn from the lynda.com instructional videos collection, and I mean anything.  Success is measured in terms of hours of video watched and staff morale.  They described it as an holistic approach to staff development.

In the afternoon I headed over to Holborn for Dragon Hall’s TechDay. Dragon Hall were involved in the RadioActive project and are still making great internet radio. It’s fair to say that they were inspired by the project to keep on introducing their young people to more new technologies.

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The event was meant to inspire and it certainly delivered. There were kids running Minecraft on a RaspberryPi and coding in python to create their worlds rather than using the standard controls; programing enduino cubes with emoticons; Building kano computers from scratch – they were up and running playing games within minutes (click the link and scroll down, impressive stuff!); playing with software where you hand draw your own race track and then race a car around it; makeymakey; bee-bot; scratch; squishy circuits; stop motion animation using an iPhone; 3D printing; oculus rift, google cardboard and more.

The room was buzzing and there was a real sense of excitement for the future.




All of this leaves me thinking – makerspace in Ponty? Who’s in?

Fundraising Guide

The RadioActive project has produced a Funding Guide with lots of great ideas to raise money to get your internet radio show up and running.

We’re not saying you’ll need the money but it’s always nice to have a helping hand with the overheads and new equipment.

Check it out here


Internet Radio as an educational intervention

The EU funded RadioActive project is in its final days but that doesn’t mean we are suffering from RadioActive decay! Shows are set to continue with our prize winning Portuguese partners securing funding for another year, UEL funded Post grad courses, DragonHall and co.in the UK have made the RadioActive system their usual way of working and there’s no stopping the teams at Deichstadt Radio and KO-N-RAD in Germany.

Along with the great radio shows and podcasts we have produced a number of useful products;

  • Future Facilitators’ Guide – Online, offline and audio guides for anyone wishing to join in.
  • ePub and pdf versions of RadioActive Practices – a report containing many of the common practices developed and refined by participants and RadioActive researchers across this European partnership over the last two years.  And there are several examples of the significant impact felt by some of the individuals who became ‘radio-activists’ along the way.
  • The Training Suite with Technical, Journalism and Organisational hints tips and tutorials.
  • A Moodle course explaining the digital badge system and curriculum
  • A RadioActive curriculum which details many of the activities completed whilst making Internet Radio and cross matches them with the EU Lifelong Learning Key Competecies.

For more information and a wealth of other resources, check out radioactive101.eu or follow @RadioActive101 or like us on Facebook

Tackling tricky topics – Cyber Bullying

Originally posted on Babi Tech:

Cyber bullying is when someone uses technology like texting, online chat rooms and social networks to bully someone. Children may find it hard to talk about cyber-bullying so it’s important to let them know that they can talk to you about anything.

Top tips for broaching the subject;

Stay calm. Children need to know that you’ll listen without judging or threatening to deal with a bully yourself.

Conversation starters;

Who’s sent you a message today? What did you talk about?

How to deal with it;

Keep the evidence, find out how to take screen shots on http://www.take-a-screenshot.org

Don’t punish the victim by removing internet access or phone use as fear of this may prevent children from wanting to tell you if something is going on.

Do monitor internet access and phone use and take an active interest in what’s going on.

Don’t feed the trolls. As with all bullies, ignoring…

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